Category Archives: Vascular Health

Tips for Summer Travel with Health Conditions

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Summer is right around the corner and what says summer more than a summer vacation!  Are you planning any vacations – near or far – in the coming months?  Now is the time to enjoy life, so don’t let health issues get in the way of your trip around the world or even the weekend visiting the grandchildren.  Just follow these helpful travel tips and you’ll be on your way to a memorable vacation.

Medications
If you are dependent on medication to control your health conditions, you’ll want to make sure you plan well ahead.  They last thing you want is to run out of your medication in the middle of the Amazon (or even Disney World).  Get your prescriptions renewed ahead of time and bring enough for the duration of your trip, plus a little extra.  You never know what your vacation might entail.

If any of your medications are temperature-dependent, you’ll want to plan for this, too.  A wide-mouthed, insulated thermos is very handy.  Just fill the bottle with ice ahead of time to cool it.  Once cool, dry it and place medications inside.  They should stay cool until you arrive at your destination.

Insurance Cards and Other Health Documentation
When it comes to visits to the doctor or hospital on your vacation, it’s good to plan for the worst and hope for the best.  That said, you’ll need to make sure you have any insurance and prescription cards with you, as well as any other medical records or documentation that may be handy to an unfamiliar physician you may have to see if it becomes necessary for you to seek medical care.

Carry-On Bag
Medications and insurance cards should be carried in your carry-on bag.  The airlines do their best to make sure your checked bags arrive at the correct destination with you, but things happen from time to time.  You will not want to be without these most important items.

Inform Others of Your Condition
You may find it prudent to inform TSA agents, flight attendants or other officials of your medical conditions.  If you experience a medical emergency mid-travel, it will be helpful for them to have fore-knowledge of your conditions.  They will be able to act faster and more efficiently to help if they are aware of any conditions up front.

Dress Comfortably
Travel has a way of being uncomfortable as it is.  The more comfortably you dress, the less discomfort you’ll experience.  Seamless socks from SmartKnit will help prevent your feet from becoming irritated, especially if your travel will include a lot of walking through airports.  Compression Travel Socks from Therafirm are also a good choice to help prevent deep vein thrombosis or DVT – a dangerous condition that travelers are at risk for.

And of course, we always recommend that you follow a doctor’s instructions for any health condition.  But, we hope these tips will help you enjoy a memorable summer vacation with minimal risk to your health.  Bon Voyage!

 

Prevent DVT and Follow Doctor’s Orders with Fashionable Compression Hosiery

March is DVT Awareness Month.  DVT stands for Deep Vein Thrombosis.  DVT is basically the condition of blood clots in the deep veins, usually the calf or thigh muscle.  DVT can damage the valves in your blood vessels, causing pain and swelling.  But, more dangerously, blood clots can break free and travel through the bloodstream and damage major organs – most specifically the heart and lungs.  This condition is known as pulmonary embolism.  Blood clots in the deep veins in the thigh muscles are the frequent culprits of pulmonary embolism.

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So, who is at greater risk of developing DVT?  The following conditions may make DVT more likely;

  • Inherited blood-clotting disorder – An inherited disorder would make the development of blood clots is more common.
  • Prolonged bed rest – When the legs do not move for long periods of time, it is more difficult for blood to circulate.
  • Injury or surgery – Injury or surgery to the veins increases blood clot risks.
  • Pregnancy – Increased pressure in the veins during pregnancy makes these women more susceptible to blood clots.
  • Birth control or hormone replacement therapy – Both increase risk of blood clots.
  • Overweight or obesity – Extra weight can increase pressure on the veins making blood clots more likely.
  • Smoking – Smoking affects circulation, which increases the risk of DVT.
  • Cancer – The disease itself, as well as some of the treatments involved can increase the risk of blood clots.
  • Heart failure – Those with limited heart and lung function can be at greater risk of pulmonary embolism.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease – Diseases such as Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis can both increase risk of DVT.
  • Personal or family history – Risk factors can be hereditary.
  • Age – Although people of any age can develop DVT, those over the age of 60 are at greater risk.
  • Sitting for long periods of time – Remaining still for long periods of time (car or air travel, for example) can negatively affect circulation leading to greater risk of DVT.

Source: Mayo Clinic

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If you experience any of the previous conditions, or any combinations of these conditions, you are at a greater risk for developing DVT.  Your doctor may suggest that you begin wearing compression hosiery to promote circulation and prevent dangerous blood clots.  The good news is that compression stockings do not have to be ugly or uncomfortable, as they have traditionally been thought of.

Therafirm has many beautiful and fashionable options that allow those at risk for DVT to follow doctor’s orders and still maintain a stylish and modern look.

 

 

 

EASE, a fairly new brand from Therafirm, offers very fashionable styles and colors, also, but in higher compression levels (15-20mmHg, 20-30mmHg and 30-40mmHg).  EASE hosiery products are made with beautiful fibers and are designed to be easier to put on and more comfortable to wear.  A recent addition to our EASE line is Microfiber Tights.  These beautiful tights are not only fashionable, but incredibly comfortable, offering the necessary compression for those at risk of developing DVT.

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EASE Microfiber Tights in Mulberry.

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EASE Thigh Highs in Coal.

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EASE Pantyhose in Bronze.

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EASE Men’s Trouser Socks in Navy.

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EASE Knee Highs in Sand.

And an exciting new addition in the EASE family, available only just this month, is Sheer EASE.  With all the same benefits of our previous opaque EASE line, but in beautiful sheer fabrics.  Look for this option coming to our www.therafirm.com website within days!

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Sheer EASE Knee Highs in Natural.

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Sheer EASE Pantyhose in Sand.

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Sheer EASE Thigh Highs in Bronze.

It’s an exciting time to wear compression hosiery, because the fashionable choices from Therafirm allow you to prevent DVT and not compromise on style!

 

*Contraindications: Any skin irritations, allergies to dyes, congestive heart failure, arterial disorders, existing DVT. If any of these conditions apply, please consult your physician for advice.

** Disclaimer – Not to take the place of medical advice.  Always consult with your doctor about health concerns.

Compression for Travelers

It’s summer and travel is in the air.  But, one thing that can stop travelers in their tracks and end summer fun and adventures – DVT.  DVT stands for Deep Vein Thrombosis, or blood clots in the deep veins, usually in the calf or thigh muscle.

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Image courtesy of potowizard at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

DVT can damage the valves in your blood vessels, causing pain and swelling.  But, more dangerously, blood clots can break free and travel through the bloodstream and damage major organs – most specifically the heart and lungs.  This is a condition known as pulmonary embolism.  Blood clots in the deep veins of the thigh muscles are the most frequently affected.

Long distance travel can increase your risk of developing DVT.  Blood flows more slowly when sitting immobile for long periods of time in cramped spaces, and gravity makes it more difficult for blood to adequately move around the body.  Slow moving blood pooling in the legs increases the possibility of blood clots.

True gradient compression hosiery can be effective in preventing DVT.  The pressure created from gradient compression helps to promote blood flow, which in turn will prevent blood from pooling in the legs.  Anyone at risk for DVT should consider wearing compression hosiery for any travel, especially lengthy flights or car trips.

DVT Risk

Therafirm gradient compression hosiery is a great choice in preventing DVT among travelers.  Therafirm offers both casual and more dressy options for both men and women.  Mild Support Ribbed Dress Socks for men offer 15-20mmHg of compression and are made with the Micro-Cool process which wicks away moisture for a comfortable coolness.  Similarly, Mild Support Ribbed Trouser Socks for women provide true gradient compression for traveling women.  Core-Spun everyday socks offer a casual true gradient compression option for both men and women.

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Women's-travel-pack

Select Women’s or Men’s Travel 2-Packs for an easy way to cover all trips on your schedule.

Avoid DVT During Spring and Summer Travels

Prevent DVT during travelImage courtesy of potowizard at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

March is DVT Awareness Month, and with spring and summer travel just around the corner, we thought it was the perfect time to remind you of this danger involved in traveling.  So, what is DVT?

ID-10073024Image courtesy of Mister GC at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

DVT stands for Deep Vein Thrombosis, or for those of us that aren’t doctors – blood clots in the deep veins, usually the calf or thigh muscle.  DVT can damage the valves in your blood vessels, causing pain and swelling.  But, more dangerously, blood clots can break free and travel through the bloodstream and damage major organs – most specifically the heart and lungs.  This is a condition known as pulmonary embolism.  Blood clots in the deep veins in the thigh muscles are the most frequent culprits of pulmonary embolism.

ID-100151625Image courtesy of phanlop88 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

How does this relate to travel?  Long trips in cars, trains, buses and most especially planes can increase your risk of developing DVT.  Blood flows more slowly when sitting immobile for long periods of time in cramped spaces, and gravity plays its part in making it more difficult for blood to adequately move around the body.  Slow moving blood pooling in the legs is a breeding ground for clots.

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Although the risk of developing DVT while traveling is small, the risk is real and travelers should take precautions – especially if they are at higher risk.

DVT Risk

What can you do to prevent DVT while traveling?

  1. First and foremost. Wear compression hosiery like travel socks from Therafirm.  Therafirm makes a Men’s Dress Sock, a Women’s Trouser Sock and a Unisex Everyday Sock.  All of Therafirm’s compression hosiery is graduated.  Compression hosiery must be graduated to be effective in preventing DVT.  Gradient compression pressure helps to promote blood flow and prevents blood from pooling in the legs.
  2. Keep moving. If you are taking a car trip, make frequent stops.  For plane, bus or train trips, get up and move around every so often as soon as it is deemed safe to do so.
  3. Exercise your legs. Bend and straighten your legs several times every half hour to hour.  This helps to avoid blood pooling.
  4. Drink plenty of water. Water will help keep your blood thinner and less likely to develop clots.
  5. Avoid alcohol. Alcohol contributes to dehydration, which thickens the blood.

Prevent DVT

No one wants their travel to include a stop at an emergency room or hospital, so take the necessary precautions to prevent DVT.  Pack your Therafirm travel socks and enjoy your DVT-free vacations!

** NOTE: Always consult your doctor before using any of the practices for avoiding DVT.