Memorial Day Style Inspiration

Summer is on the horizon and with summer comes summer fashions.  Are you wondering how to maintain your style and comply with doctor’s orders to wear compression hosiery?  That’s easier than it’s ever been with beautiful and stylish fashion compression hosiery from Therafirm.

TFL polyvore

My favorite thing to do of late is to dress in neutral colors with one spicy pop color!  That was the idea behind this ensemble, which is perfect for all your Memorial Day fun!  A sweet, but comfy casual t-shirt dress will give you the stylish appearance you’re looking for, but is oh so comfortable!  And a t-shirt dress allows you to easily add a pair of TherafirmLight footless tights for the healthy benefits of compression.  Opt for the same subtle color for your fingernail paint, as well as a matching bag and strappy sandal combo.  Then, choose your “pop” color for your jewelry.  For this set, I chose bright red scarf, earrings and bracelet.  And for the finishing touches, use the same “pop” color for your uncovered toes!  You’re ready for a backyard barbecue, an outdoor garden wedding or even an afternoon baseball game in box seats!

Core-Spun Patterns Polyvore

Guys want to look their best, too!  And now they can, even when the doctor prescribes compression hosiery.  It’s okay guys, you won’t be stuck wearing old lady stockings.  How about a pair of fashionable Core-Spun Patterns socks!  Core-Spun socks are the ultimate in comfort with super soft and stretchy yarns.  You won’t even realize you’re wearing compression.  Now that Core-Spun socks are available in patterns, you can be comfortable, healthy AND stylish all at once!  There are four new Core-Spun Patterns available for both men and women, but the pair in this set is Merger.  Black socks with navy and gray stripes were the inspiration for this men’s fashion set.  They can be paired with your favorite weekend jeans and a simple gray polo shirt.  Add your everyday accessories including a nice pair of shades and you’re ready for grilling!

Lovely in Lavender

Core-Spun Patterns are not just for the men.  This pair, called Trendsetter, are also great for the ladies!  And for a nice Memorial Day weekend ensemble, pair them with a pair of fashion jeans and a sweet flowy blouse.  My favorite color is purple, so I navigate to it naturally.  But, what a beacon of spring!  I added a butterfly bag and purple accessories to polish off an outfit perfect for Summer’s opening weekend!

Tips for Summer Travel with Health Conditions

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Summer is right around the corner and what says summer more than a summer vacation!  Are you planning any vacations – near or far – in the coming months?  Now is the time to enjoy life, so don’t let health issues get in the way of your trip around the world or even the weekend visiting the grandchildren.  Just follow these helpful travel tips and you’ll be on your way to a memorable vacation.

Medications
If you are dependent on medication to control your health conditions, you’ll want to make sure you plan well ahead.  They last thing you want is to run out of your medication in the middle of the Amazon (or even Disney World).  Get your prescriptions renewed ahead of time and bring enough for the duration of your trip, plus a little extra.  You never know what your vacation might entail.

If any of your medications are temperature-dependent, you’ll want to plan for this, too.  A wide-mouthed, insulated thermos is very handy.  Just fill the bottle with ice ahead of time to cool it.  Once cool, dry it and place medications inside.  They should stay cool until you arrive at your destination.

Insurance Cards and Other Health Documentation
When it comes to visits to the doctor or hospital on your vacation, it’s good to plan for the worst and hope for the best.  That said, you’ll need to make sure you have any insurance and prescription cards with you, as well as any other medical records or documentation that may be handy to an unfamiliar physician you may have to see if it becomes necessary for you to seek medical care.

Carry-On Bag
Medications and insurance cards should be carried in your carry-on bag.  The airlines do their best to make sure your checked bags arrive at the correct destination with you, but things happen from time to time.  You will not want to be without these most important items.

Inform Others of Your Condition
You may find it prudent to inform TSA agents, flight attendants or other officials of your medical conditions.  If you experience a medical emergency mid-travel, it will be helpful for them to have fore-knowledge of your conditions.  They will be able to act faster and more efficiently to help if they are aware of any conditions up front.

Dress Comfortably
Travel has a way of being uncomfortable as it is.  The more comfortably you dress, the less discomfort you’ll experience.  Seamless socks from SmartKnit will help prevent your feet from becoming irritated, especially if your travel will include a lot of walking through airports.  Compression Travel Socks from Therafirm are also a good choice to help prevent deep vein thrombosis or DVT – a dangerous condition that travelers are at risk for.

And of course, we always recommend that you follow a doctor’s instructions for any health condition.  But, we hope these tips will help you enjoy a memorable summer vacation with minimal risk to your health.  Bon Voyage!

 

Fun DIY Sock Bouquets!!

As both a Mom and a Daughter, I completely believe in homemade Mother’s Day gifts.  I love getting these sweet gifts from my kiddos and I totally love giving them to my mom and my mother-in-law.  Sometimes the creativity is just not flowing, though, and I look all around for new ideas.  This year the Knit-Rite/Therafirm team got some inspiration from our own products.  The best part is, we were able to use products from several of our brands to create these adorable sock bouquets.  They’re cute and easy enough for the kiddos to do, too.  Watch our demonstration video below!

List of Supplies Needed:

• Socks of multiple colors, shapes and sizes
• A pair of tights, pantyhose or a piece of fabric of similar size and length
• Rubber bands
• Safety pins
• Your favorite vase

We used some discontinued colors of our Preggers and Therafirm brands, as well as current colors of TheraSport, SmartKnitKIDS, SmartKnit and Therafirm.  Happy bouquet making!

International Women’s Day: #BeBoldForChange

picmonkey-collage2In a few days, March 8, 2017, women around the world will celebrate International Women’s Day.  According to their website, the day is a global celebration of the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women.  And the day marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity.

In 2017, the achievements our gender has made in society are more visible than ever. We can vote, true, and we’re nearing on the 100th anniversary of suffrage. And the strides have been even greater than that. We’ve seen women holding high office.  Madeleine Albright became the first woman to hold the office of Secretary of State in 1997, and since then 3 of the last 6 have been women.  We’ve seen a female Attorney General, four different women on the U.S. Supreme Court, and many other cabinet positions.  The first woman elected to the U.S. House happened in 1917 and the first U.S. Senator a handful of years later in 1932.  And most recently, we’ve seen the first woman to run for President for a major political party.  We see women owning companies and heading corporations.  They are doctors, lawyers, scientists, astronauts.  Our gender has cracked the glass ceiling, but there is still work to do.

Attention for women’s achievements ebbs and flows in news cycles, but seems to be at the forefront of late.  Women, as a whole, are still not paid equally to their male counterparts.  Women are still not present in equal numbers in business and politics.  And globally, many improvements are still needed for women’s education and health, as well as the disproportionate numbers of violence against women.

The 2017 theme for International Women’s Day is #BeBoldForChange.  Change is still needed.  At our current rate of speed, the gender gap won’t close entirely until the year 2186, according to the World Economic Forum.  But, if we are bold for change, we can make that happen faster.

Change can be big or small.  What kinds of things can we, as women, change as individuals?  Below are 5 things we can work on to better ourselves and to help leave our mark on the world.

Perspective

Have you ever heard of the phrase “mind over matter”?  I’ll bet you have.  That’s what I mean by perspective.  The first step to making change in our lives is changing our perspective of things.  I hate getting groceries every week or doing laundry.  But, since they are necessary chores to the well-being of my family, I do them.  I can look at them with dread, or I can be thankful that I have the funds to buy food for my family.  I can clothe my children and keep their clothes clean.  Maybe, I have a family member or co-worker that is difficult to be around.  I can choose to avoid them or be unkind to them.  Or, I can change my perception and look at things from their perspective.  Looking at things from their perspective will give me a better understanding of why they are difficult, and possibly I can help them.  Changing perspective can apply to almost anything in our lives.

Career

I think this is area that is most reflective of the #BeBoldForChange theme. Most of us spend 8 – 10 of our waking hours per day at our jobs.  This is time not spent with family or friends or doing things we love.  With so many hours spent doing a job, it had better be something you enjoy doing.  If not, make a change.  Get a new job or go back to school.  But, be happy in your career.  Maybe you love your job, but feel that a raise or promotion is overdue.  It’s time to make a change.  Be bold and ask for what you feel you deserve.  You may not get it, but as long as you are courteous and professional, you’ll go a long way in making cracks in that glass ceiling.

Relationships

This is such a tough one for us women, but is an area of such importance.  Evaluate your relationships, including friendships and family relationships.  Nurture the good relationships – the ones that are good for your well-being; the ones that bring you joy; the ones you learn from and who show you kindness.  Repair the fragile ones that are worth saving.  And cut ties with the toxic ones.  Life is too short to let others bring you down.

Health

There are so many things we can do to change the state of our health.  The obvious one is diet and exercise, but be careful in that.  There are so many harmful ones out there.  If you diet, choose one that includes healthy foods and doesn’t make you feel bad or lacking.  Choose an active lifestyle, but know your limitations.  Don’t participate in exercise that is harmful to any condition you are living with. Chose exercise that makes you feel good and something you like to do.  You’re more apt to keep up with it if you do.  Other things you can do to become healthier or to maintain good health include brushing and flossing your teeth, getting plenty of good sleep and avoiding or limiting things like tobacco, caffeine or alcohol.  Drink plenty of water.  Most doctors and nutritionists recommend drinking eight 8-ounce glasses of water per day.  Finally, follow your doctor’s suggestions to improve your health.  This includes wearing your compression! 😉

Legacy

Most people want to leave a legacy on this world, but your legacy can be whatever you want it to be.  Many women leave their legacy with meaningful careers – doctors, teachers, politicians, businesswomen, police officers, etc.  Or your legacy may be motherhood.  Parents are the first teachers of every child and raising well-adjusted and contributing members of society is such a huge legacy in itself.  Or perhaps your legacy is the mark you leave on the world in other ways – volunteering with veterans or the homeless, fostering a child, cleaning up a local park, or even just spreading simple kindnesses to strangers.

Whatever you do, don’t be afraid to make changes happen in your life.  Have faith and courage and be bold.  And from all of us at Knit-Rite/Therafirm, Happy International Women’s Day!

 

 

 

John Kohler’s Run across Kansas journey!

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Introducing John Kohler, a husband, father, brother, partner, friend, and to some a hero! John is also an avid believer in gradient athletic compression for performance and recovery, and recently began wearing our TheraSport Athletic Performance and Recovery Socks and Sleeves.  Last November, he set out on a trip that most of us will only dream of – a LONG foot-run across the entire STATE OF KANSAS. Yes, think Forest Gump style.  He averaged 40+ miles a day and accomplished it in 11 days. Let me clarify, he ran 435 miles in 11 days with his two feet! We were so intrigued by his journey that we wanted to know what his secret was.

Q: What inspired you to do the “run across Kansas” challenge?

A: The thought to run Kansas came to me a few years back. I did some research and noticed that no one had run across the state East/West or West/East. At that point I was enticed to make the first attempt. As I began to look at it more seriously the reasons to do it only grew from there. What turned out to be the biggest reason was I wanted to do it for my kids. My hope is that one day down the line, if they’re having a tough go at it, they will draw some strength from this. And of course the charity aspect of raising funds and bringing awareness to SocialHeart.

From socialheart.org: SocialHeart is a non-profit organization that is 100% volunteer managed with the goal of creating a better community by supporting all local charities through unique, fun fundraising events, social media and marketing promotions and volunteer support. 

Q: Did you ever feel like giving up or regretting this journey? What kept you going?

A: You definitely have your moments when you want to throw in the towel and think “WHAT AM I DOING?” On the fourth day, after about 10 miles I was sitting on the side of the road in the middle of Kansas and I just lost it. I was tired, the pain of the last three days had accumulated and set in, and I just felt spent physically and mentally. The three guys on my crew stood there and they just let me release all that frustration. After I composed myself I got up and looked down the road, to my left the road I came from, to my right, down the road I was headed. At that point there were only two options, to quit, or to just keep putting one foot in front of the other. I then thought of my wife and kids. They had already sacrificed so much to allow me to do this. If I quit, it felt like a waste of that sacrifice. I owed it to them to give it everything I had and at that point realized quitting was not an option. So I put my head down and told myself to just take the journey 5 miles at a time. Thirty-eight miles later the day was done and I was stronger for it.

Q: What did your sleep and diet look like during those 11 days?

A: My diet wasn’t exactly what I hoped it would be, but when you’re running 10-11 hours a day it boils down to convenience. My dad was the cook and when he could, he made chicken, breakfast burritos and grilled burgers. That being said I had to have A LOT of calories to sustain. Besides recovery, having sufficient food intake was integral in keeping me going. In the morning I would eat leftovers from the night before, peanut butter sandwiches with chips and protein bars were a main staple on the road during the day. At night there was pizza, burgers, and sub sandwiches, which are things I do not normally eat, but I worked with what I had and it got me to the end. Sleep was roughly 6-8 hours a day, as the journey progressed I had a hard time falling asleep and just sleeping in general. I would sleep 1-3 hours and then be awake and then sleep 1-3 hours, etc.

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Q: What was your average run a day?

A: I averaged roughly 41 miles a day. Looking back I should’ve taken a more even keel approach instead of the 50 mile days followed by 30-40 mile days, but this was a giant experiment so you just kind of wing it!

Q: What did you do recover for the next day?

A: Going into it I knew recovery was key. As soon as I got back to camp I would sit on top of two 10-pound ice bags and then put two more on the top of my legs covering my thighs/knees. Afterwards I would put on either compression socks or compression pants and keep those on for a while before bed.

Q: Do you wear compression or have you worn any before?

A: I’ve been wearing compression since I began running and I’m a firm believer in its recovery abilities. During the days I would also periodically wear calf sleeves while I was on the road. I feel that they help with reducing the stress put on your legs as they hit the road.

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Q: If you had a choice, would you do this challenge again?

A: When I started this journey I was just wanting to, well…just run. I never thought in a million years I would get so many messages and stories from folks inspired by what I was doing.

 Q: What would you want us, the readers, to know about your goal?

A: My hope is that people will realize that it’s not about running, in fact it’s not even about sport or physical fitness. It’s about finding your passion, something you love. When you find that, do it with all your heart. Set some small goals and set a big goal, one that really scares you. Accomplish those little goals and it’ll give you the confidence to keep raising the bar. Then one day that scary goal will feel attainable and realistic. Then, just go for it, all in! Don’t be afraid to fail. You will be surprised what you’re made of and who YOU will inspire.

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What an unforgettable experience! Thank you, John, for taking the time to share your journey with all of us, as well as supporting TheraSport!

As Seen In: Pregnancy & Newborn January 2017 Issue

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Brand new Patterned Core-Spun Compression Socks by Therafirm (makers of Preggers) are featured in the January 2017 issue of Pregnancy & Newborn.  Sweet and feminine Thin Line socks are super cute and super comfortable. Be fashionable AND healthy in the New Year!  Thanks P&N for introducing your readers to benefits of Preggers and Therafirm legwear!

Read more about Preggers legwear benefits here!

Looking at Life 100 Years Ago

Emma Morano was born on November 29, 1899 in Italy and is currently the oldest living person on Earth.  At just two months short of 117 years old, she is one of the world’s roughly 450,000 centenarians.  A centenarian is someone who has lived to be 100 years old or older – something that Ms. Morano did back in 1999.

emma-morano

Nearly 117-year-old Emma Morano.  Photo from people.com.

Living to be 100 years old is quite a feat, but one that is becoming more common with increases and health care and living conditions.  In fact, according to www.thecentenarian.co.uk, centenarians are the fastest growing segment of the population.  Since National Centenarian Day is today, September 22, this got us thinking about how much our industry, as well as the world around us, has changed in 100 years.  The comparison is mind blowing!  Check it out below:

1916 for Industries Served by Knit-Rite and Therafirm

  • Knit-Rite and Therafirm were not yet in operation.
  • Nylon was not used for stockings until the 1930s. In 1916, stockings were made of cotton or silk.
  • Amputations resulting from WWI during this time brought the importance of technology and development of prostheses to the attention of the US Surgeon General of the Army. This led to the formation of the American Orthotic & Prosthetic Association (AOPA) the year following in 1917.
  • Medical compression was used to treat some conditions, such as varicose veins, but due to the lack of today’s chemical fibers, materials used included laced stockings, elastic bands and tight bandages with resin.
  • Use of gradient compression was still a half a century away.prosthesisA look at prosthetic devices from the past. Photo from prosthetic-limbs.yolasite.com.

1916 Cost of Living

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A postage stamp from 1916. Photo from vistastamps.com.

(Costs are averages) 1916 2016
Postage Stamp $0.02 $0.49
Coffee (per pound) $0.30 $7.94
Sugar (per pound) $0.04 $1.74
Eggs (per dozen) $0.38 $1.33
Bread (per loaf) $0.04 $1.98
Car $360 $33,560
Gas (per gallon) $0.22 $2.21
Home $3,000 $379,800
Gold (per ounce) $20.67 $1,272.50
Movie Ticket $0.07 $8.17

The average income in 1916 was roughly $700 per year for men and $350 per year for women.

1916 US Politics and History

  • The 33rd US Presidential election was held on November 7, 1916. Incumbent President and Democrat Woodrow Wilson beat the Republican challenger and Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes.campaign-buttonCampaign button from the 1916 election. Photo from britannica.com.
  • The Democrats held a majority in both the House of Representatives and the Senate.
  • Speaker of the House was Democrat Champ Clark. The House had 435 voting members.
  • The Senate, led by President pro temp. James Clarke, had 96 Senators.
  • Chief Justice of the Supreme Court was Edward Douglass White.
  • The US population was 101,961,000.
  • The American flag had only 45 stars even though the US had 48 states.
  • The first woman to serve in the US Congress, Jeannette Rankin, a 36-year-old Republican from Montana, was elected.
  • The Reserve Officer Training Corp – ROTC – is established.
  • Louis Brandeis becomes the first Jewish justice of the Supreme Court.

1916 World Events

  • The world was embroiled in World War I (then known as the Great War) between Allied Powers, led by France, the British Empire and Russia, and the Central Powers, led by Germany and Austria-Hungary. The US would later join the Allied Powers in 1917.
  • Paris, France was first bombed by German zeppelins.
  • The Battle of Verdun, one of the largest and longest battles of WWI, was fought in France between February 21 and December 18, 1916.World War One, Battle of Verdun. French trench on the front lines, 1916. (Photo by Roger Viollet/Getty Images)Front line trenches, Battle of Verdun, 1916. Photo from history.com.
  • US President Woodrow Wilson sends 12,000 troops across the US-Mexico border to pursue Pancho Villa during the Mexican Revolution.

1916 Sports

  • The Professional Golfers Association of America (PGA) was created.
  • The World Series was won by the Boston Red Sox. Babe Ruth, then a 21-year-old pitcher, won game 2.  The Red Sox would go on to win the series again in 1918 before suffering an 86-year drought.babe-ruthBabe Ruth during the 1916 baseball season. Photo from libaseballmag.com.
  • The Chicago Cubs played their first game in Wrigley Field (then called Weeghman Park). Wrigley is currently the second oldest active MLB ballpark, opening in 1914.  The Cubs have never won a World Series during their 100 years playing at Wrigley, and are now in their 108th year since a title and 71st year since an appearance in the World Series.
  • The Super Bowl was still 51 years away from existing. The NFL, which began as the American Professional Football Conference, was still 4 years away from its inaugural season.
  • The first Tournament of Roses football game (Rose Bowl) was played between Washington State University and Brown University. The Rose Bowl is the oldest American college football bowl game.
  • The Summer Olympics was scheduled to be held in Berlin, Germany, but was cancelled due to World War I.

1916 Achievements, Inventions and Other Firsts

  • The first blood transfusion was performed by British Royal Army Medical Corps.
  • The Eiffel Tower in Paris, France, at 984 feet, was the world’s tallest building. The tallest building in 2016 is the Burj Khalifa in dubai, UAE at 2,723 feet.eiffelThe Eiffel Tower in 1916. Photo from warbirdinformationexchange.org.
  • Albert Einstein completed his formulation of a general theory of relativity.
  • Claude Monet painted his Water Lilies series of paintings.
  • The light switch was invented.
  • The Saturday Evening Post published its first cover featuring a Norman Rockwell painting.
  • Actor Charlie Chaplin signed with Mutual Studios earning $10,000 per week.
  • The tow truck was invented by Ernest Holmes, Sr.
  • The first supermarket, Piggly Wiggly, opened.pigglyThe first supermarket, Piggly Wiggly, in 1916. Photo from historic-memphis.com.
  • The hamburger bun was invented by a fry cook named Walter Anderson. He later founded White Castle.
  • The first Boeing aircraft, a Bluebell seaplane, made its first flight.
  • Lincoln Logs were invented by John L. Wright. His son Frank Lloyd Wright grew up to be a famous architect.
  • German automobile company, BMW was founded.
  • President Woodrow Wilson signs legislation creating the National Park Service.
  • The first 40-hour work week begins at the Endicott-Johnson factories in New York.

1916 Miscellaneous

  • Only 6% of Americans had graduated high school.
  • The US had only 230 reported murders.
  • Life expectancy was 49.6 years for men and 54.3 years for women.
  • Only 14% of homes had a bathtub.
  • The population of Las Vegas, Nevada was 30.
  • The maximum speed limit in most cities was 10 mph.
  • 90% of all doctors had no college education.
  • Marijuana, heroin and morphine were available at local drugstores over-the-counter.
  • The leading causes of death were pneumonia, influenza, and tuberculosis.
  • Margaret Sanger opened the first birth control clinic in the country.
  • The first fortune cookies were produced in Los Angeles, California.
  • “Somewhere a Voice is Calling” by John McCormack was the number one song title.
  • 8% of American homes had a telephone.

1916 Notable Births

  • Jackie Gleason, American comedian, actor and musician
  • Dinah Shore, American singer
  • Gregory Peck, American actor
  • Beverly Cleary, American author
  • Robert McNamara, former US Secretary of Defense
  • Roald Dahl, Welsh-born author
  • Walter Cronkite, American television journalistcronkiteWalter Cronkite was born in 1916. Photo from blogs.uoregon.edu.
  • Kirk Douglas, American film actor
  • Betty Grable, American actress

Things have changed dramatically in 100 years.  Imagine how different life will be by the next 100.

Sources:

www.thecentenarian.co.uk

http://thecircular.org/sixteen-differences-1916-2016-100-years-change/

http://www.infoplease.com/year/1916.html

http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2016/01/1916_sports_famous_firsts_achi.html

http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2016/01/1916_facts_famous_firsts_birth.html

http://dailygenius.com/facts-about-the-year-1916/

http://kimberleykoz.com/a-look-at-one-hundred-years-ago-1916/

http://www.amputee-coalition.org/resources/a-brief-history-of-prosthetics/

http://unyq.com/the-history-of-prosthetics/

http://www.stockingirl.com/HIST.html

http://www.twistcollective.com/collection/107-articles/1776-hosiery-history

http://www.hidez.com.au/?route=information/information&information_id=4

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compression_stockings

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2016/05/13/shes-only-person-left-born-1800s/84321322/